Evil Eye Oil – for protecting against the evil eye

$11.00

More about our evil eye oil. When a person wears or carries an evil eye with them, it guards against misfortune and protects from the cursing glare of someone giving you the “evil eye.” You can always make your own evil eye amulets with something as simple as beads. Use this oil to anoint all of your evil eye charms, jewelry and beads to give them added power. The oils can be used to anoint your door and window frames to keep harm out. Papa Gee’s oils are made for ritual, prayer, and spellwork and contain the living ingredients that were historically used for this magickal purpose.

Some ingredients include: alkanet, angelica, vetiver, lavender, tea tree, and other herbs and essential oils in a base of fractionated coconut oil.

Description

Evil Eye Oil. When a person wears or carries an evil eye with them, it guards against misfortune and protects from the cursing glare of someone giving you the “evil eye.” You can always make your own evil eye amulets with something as simple as beads. Use this oil to anoint all of your evil eye charms, jewelry and beads to give them added power. The oils can be used to anoint your door and window frames to keep harm out. Papa Gee’s oils are made for ritual, prayer, and spellwork and contain the living ingredients that were historically used for this magickal purpose.

The evil eye, or ayin ha’ra in Hebrew, is a traditional curse that is thought to be a malicious look that is delivered to someone when they are not aware of it. It is rumored that individuals who are impacted by it would experience misfortune, disease, and even death. This centuries-old practice is influenced by a wide variety of cultural beliefs and practices from all around the world. Talismans and amulets are hung as defense against its power throughout the Middle East and North Africa, while black thread armbands or bracelets are believed to have the same effect in India. To fend off any possible evil, clay crosses may be painted on door frames in South America. Superstition still influences how many individuals react to potentially dangerous situations, especially when someone stares at them for an extended period of time, even though there may not be any scientific proof for the existence of this curse.